68 Forest Fires In Alaska

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Doka
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68 Forest Fires In Alaska

Post by Doka » 07-22-2019 09:46 PM

Maryals51, You are in Alaska, (if I remember correctly :?: ) Hope all is well with you! Pretty close to 2 million acres burnt.
Our area has sent some Fire Fighters up. I would like to think we won't need them here, but our forests around here, have been left such bad shape, it is only a matter of TIME.

So many so fires, so big. They more than likely just let them burn unless in more populated areas?

https://www.alaskacenters.gov/trip-plan ... es/current


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https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm

Alaska Wildfire Info

https://akfireinfo.com/
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Re: 68 Forest Fires In Alaska

Post by Doka » 07-23-2019 01:46 AM

Here some pesky little guys eating the forests, when I was a young girl, the loggers where loggin, clearing the brush out, removing diseased trees. The tussock moth infested large parts of our forest area here. You couldn't even have a picnic without the larva falling on your plate. They sprayed(the spray has been available for may be 50 years). Over time, they made the loggers stop logging and stop spraying, so now we have forests that are like "Atom Bombs" going off, when they burn........if you think Cow Farts should be stopped, then you will really lose your mind about carbon released from these monster forest fires. Hypocrisy and lies seem to surface every where you scratch, most are fine with it, don't want to know don't want want to know...............Some of Us both know and care .........what world, we could have!

"two to three times the emissions from fossil fuel burning from all other sectors in B.C."


Rusty tussock moths invade Seward Peninsula
Fri, 07/12/2019 -

The rusty tussock moth has invaded the tundra in the Nome area, an infestation of the species not seen this far north before.
The hungry little caterpillars, the larval stage of the moth, chew their way through a wide variety of vegetation. Brown patches on the tundra, willow bushes cleared of leaves and even chewed up rhubarb bear testimony to their great numbers and enormous appetite.
“They have a range of hosts,” said Dr. Stephen Burr, entomologist with the U.S. Forest Service based in Fairbanks. While they are found in large numbers on the willows locally they also can eat conifers, blueberry bushes and other types of vegetation according to Dr. Burr. Scientists describe them as “polyphagous,” meaning they eat a variety of plants.
The critter’s scientific name is Orgyia antiqua, and also known as the Vapourer moth, the rusty tussock moth is in the family Erebidae. They are native to Europe but have been in North America for a long time.

http://www.nomenugget.com/news/rusty-tu ... -peninsula



How do CO2 emissions from forest fires compare to those from fossil fuels?


Dr. Kurz says that in 2017 about 1.2 million hectares of forest burned in British Columbia, and 1.3 million hectares and counting this year. Compared to the average annual area burned in the province between 1990 and 2015, each of the last two years burned 15 times more than the average area. Forest fires like these release carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses, such as methane into the atmosphere. The initial - albeit unofficial - estimate is that the direct fire emissions in 2017 were about 150 (plus/minus 30) million tons of carbon dioxide.This is
https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/sept-15 ... -1.4821944
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Re: 68 Forest Fires In Alaska

Post by Doka » 07-31-2019 02:00 AM

As of 7/30/2019 There are 70 fires in Alaska. But there is something a a bit unusual going on...........fires are circling the Arctic! :shock:


Arctic wildfires: What's caused huge swathes of flames to spread?

Wildfires are ravaging the Arctic, with areas of northern Siberia, northern Scandinavia, Alaska and Greenland engulfed in flames.

Lightning frequently triggers fires in the region but this year they have been worsened by summer temperatures that are higher than average because of climate change.

Plumes of smoke from the fires can be seen from space.

Mark Parrington, a wildfires expert at the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (Cams), described them as "unprecedented".
How bad is it?

There are hundreds of fires covering mostly uninhabited regions across eastern Russia, northern Scandinavia, Greenland and Alaska.

How unusual is this?

Arctic fires are common between May and October and wildfires are a natural part of an ecosystem, offering some benefits for the environment, according to the Alaska Centers website.

But the intensity of these fires, as well as the large area they have taken up, make these unusual.


https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49125391
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